A Pancreatic Cancer Patient – Seven Years Later

More than seven years ago, I was asked to see a patient in consultation. This vigorous 54-year-old gentleman had already undergone a Whipple procedure for the treatment of a pancreatic carcinoma. His skilled-surgeon had resected most of the tumor, but could not clear the margins. With each successive attempt, he identified additional tumor. Unable to achieve a complete surgical resection, the patient was closed, recovered and visited me for a discussion of therapeutic options.

We identified a two-drug combination to be used in conjunction with external beam radiation, a regimen that few — if any — investigators would have suggested. Adjusting the doses to achieve a tolerable schedule, he completed the entire course of therapy with acceptable toxicities. Contrary to his surgeon’s expectations, the patient achieved a complete and durable remission. He returned to his active lifestyle, remarried and became an advocate for the aggressive management of pancreatic cancer.

Now, seven and a half years later with a rising CA 19.9, he is identified to have a focus of uptake on PET CT in the body of the pancreas. A surgical exploration to remove the tumor provided adequate tissue for an EVA-PCD analysis. The patient was once again tested against the standard therapies used in this setting. Among the drugs we examined are the EGFR inhibitors, the taxanes, the combination of EGFR inhibitor + gemcitabine and the platinum + 5FU combination. Each one of these would be a reasonable choice. Indeed, FOLFOX, Tarceva + gemcitabine, the GTX regimen and — most recently — Taxol-gemcitabine based combinations, would all be favored choices for medical oncologists in the U.S. today. Yet, this patient was sensitive only to cisplatin + gemcitabine and none of the others.

Following publications from a group in Scottsdale, Arizona, many oncologists are utilizing Taxol + gemcitabine. There are proponents for Tarceva + gemcitabine, and those who prefer FOLFOX. At least for this patient, none of them would’ve been right. Interestingly, after more than seven years later the patient’s profile reflects the same combination that was used initially. It is interesting to ponder, based on this finding, whether this is a new primary or a sanctuary-site recurrence with so long a disease-free interval to remain sensitive to the platinum-based combination. We now hope to provide him seven and a half more excellent years… at the very least.