Targeted Therapies for Cancer Confronts Hurdles

The September 1 issue of the ASCO Post, a periodical published by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, features an article entitled “Research in Combining Targeted Agents Faces Numerous Challenges.” Contributors to the article by Margo J. Fromer, participated in a conference sponsored by the Institute of Medicine. These scientists representing both public and private institutions examined the obstacles that confront researchers in their efforts to develop effective combinations of targeted agents.

One of the participants, Jane Perlmutter, PhD, of the Gemini Group, pointed out that advances in genomics have provided sophisticated target therapies, but noted, “cellular pathways contain redundancies that can be activated in response to inhibition of one or another pathway, thus promoting emergence of resistant cells and clinical relapse.”

James Doroshow, MD, deputy director for clinical and translational research at the NCI, said, “the mechanism of actions for a growing number of targeted agents that are available for trials, are not completely understood.” He went on to say that the “lack of the right assays or imaging tools means inability to assess the target effect of many agents.” He added that “we need to investigate the molecular effects . . .  in surrogate tissues,” and concluded “this is a huge undertaking.”

Michael T. Barrett, PhD, of TGen,  pointed out that “each patient’s cancer could require it’s own specific therapy.” This was followed by Kurt Bachman of GlaxoSmithKline, who opined, “the challenge is to identify the tumor types most likely to respond, to find biomarkers that predict response, and to define the relationship of the predictors to biology of the inhibitors.”

When I read this article I dashed to my phone and waited breathlessly for these august investigators to contact me for guidance. It was obvious that they were describing precisely the work that my colleagues and I have been doing for the past two decades. Obviously, there had been an epiphany. The complexities and redundancies of human tumor biology had finally dawned on these investigators, who had previously clung unwaiveringly to their analyte-based molecular platforms.

Eureka! Our day of vindication was at hand. The molecular biologists humbled by the manifest complexity of human tumor biology had finally recognized that they were outgunned and would, no doubt, be contacting me presently. Whole-cell experimental models had gained the hegemony they so rightly deserved. The NCI and big pharma would be beating a path to my door.

But the call never came. Perhaps they lost my number. Yes, that must be it. So let me provide it: 562.989.6455. Remember I’m on Pacific Daylight Time.