ASCO Update: Personalized Cancer Care – Our Contributions

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As part of our ongoing blog postings we like to include recent presentations and publications. On July 9, I described our ASCO presentation exploring crizotinib, “Functional Profiling Leads to Identification of Accurate Genomic Findings.

To conclude the review of our other presentations from that meeting, here is a brief summary of our work.

The first of the two was our international collaboration in personalized medicine for the treatment of advanced and drug-refractory cancers: “Clinical application of human tumor primary culture analyses.” The study reviewed the results of 67 patients from institutions across Brazil.

Tumor samples were transported by overnight courier to California for drug response profiling. A broad array of tumors were included. The overall success rate provided actionable results in 62 of 67 patients (92 percent). More than 75 percent of the studies provided results for between 8 and 16 drugs and combinations with a median of 12 reported. Several strikingly good responses were observed, including novel combinations identified in the laboratory. This study confirms the feasibility of international collaboration and reflects the globalization of medical care delivery.

The final study published by ASCO was also a collaborative effort with SageMedic of Larkspur, CA, The Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Germany and the Weisenthal Cancer Group. The study was a meta-analyses that examined the sensitivity and specificity of human tumor primary culture studies and the efficacy of drug therapies selected, based on laboratory findings. In aggregate there were 28 retrospective and 15 prospective trials included.

The overall sensitivity was 0.92 (95 percent C.I. 0.89 – 0.95), and specificity of 0.72 (95 percent C.I. 0.67 – 0.77) with an area under the curve for the ROC of 0.893 (SE = 0.023, p < 0.001). When clinical outcomes were examined, it revealed a two-fold improvement for assay-guided therapy for standard of care (odds ratio 2.04, 95 percent C.I. 1.62 – 2.57, p <  0.001). Finally, the one-year survival rate for assay-guided therapy proved superior (OR 1.44, 95% C.I. 1.06 – 1.95, p= 0.02).

As can be seen from this well conducted meta-analysis, there is a wealth of evidence to support the use of human tumor primary cultures for the selection of chemotherapy.