Bevacizumab In Colon Cancer – “A Shot Across The Bowel”

Colon2 130320.01 lo resAn E-Publication article in the February Journal of Clinical Oncology analyzes the cost efficacy of Bevacizumab for colon cancer. Bevacizumab, sold commercially as Avastin, has become a standard in the treatment of patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Indeed, Bevacizumab plus FOLFOX or FOLFIRI, are supported by NCCN guidelines and patients who receive one of these regimens are usually switched to the other at progression.

A Markov computer model explored the cost and efficacy of Bevacizumab in the first and second line setting using a well-established metric known as a Quality-Adjusted Life Year (QALY). In today’s dollars $100,000 per QALY is considered a threshold for utility of any treatment. To put this bluntly, the medical system values a year of yavastinour life at $100,000. The authors confirmed that Bevacizumab prolongs survival but that it does so at significantly increased costs. By their most optimistic projections, Bevacizumab + FOLFOX come in at more than $200,000 per QALY. Similar results were reported for Canadian, British and Japanese costs. Though more favorable, the results with FOLFIRI + Bevacizumab still came in above the $100,000 threshold.

No one doubts that Bevacizumab provides improved outcomes. It’s the incremental costs that remain an issue. Society is now confronting an era where the majority of new cancer agents come in at a cost in excess of $10,000 per month. Where and how will we draw the line that designates some treatments unaffordable? On the one hand, clinical therapies could be made available only to the “highest bidder.” However, this is contrary to the western societal ethic that holds that medical care should be available to all regardless of ability to pay. Alternatively, increasingly narrow definitions could be applied to new drugs making these treatments available to a shrinking minority of those who might actually benefit; a form of “evidence-based” rationing. A much more appealing option would be to apply validated drug predication assays for the intelligent selection of treatment candidates.
Avastin-MOA-Overview
In support of the latter, the authors state, “Bevacizumab potentially could be improved with the use of an effective biomarker to select patients most likely to benefit.” This is something that genomic (DNA) profiling has long sought to achieve but, so far, has been unable to do. This conceptual approach however is demonstrably more attractive in that all patients have equal access, futile care is avoided and the costs saved would immediately provide highly favorable QALY’s as the percentage of responders improved.

Similar to the recent reports from the National Health Service of England, the American public now confronts the challenge of meeting the needs of a growing population of cancer patients at ever-higher costs. It is only a matter of time before these same metrics described for colon cancer are applied to lung, ovarian and other cancers for which Avastin is currently approved.

At what point will the American medical system recognize the need for validated predictive platforms, like EVA-PCD analyses, that have the proven capacity to save both money and lives? We can only wonder.

Rationed or Rational: The Future of Cancer Medicine

Disturbing news from Britain’s Health Service on Monday, January 12, described the National Health Services’ decision to “delist” 25 of the nation’s 84 currently available chemotherapy drugs from their formulary. Citing the rising cost of cancer therapy Professor Peter Clark, chair of the Cancer Drug Fund said that the CDF, originally established in 2011, had already exceeded its annual budget. From ₤280 million in 2014 the costs for 2015 are projected to rise to ₤340 million. In defense of the policy Dr. Clark said the delisted drugs “did not offer sufficient clinical benefit.”

avastinAn examination of the delisted drug should raise concern for medical oncologists. Among those delisted are Bevacizumab (Avastin) for colorectal cancer, Eribulin (Haloven) and Lapatinib (Tykerb) for breast cancer and Pemetrexed (Alimta) for advanced lung cancer. Additionalhalaven deletions include Bendamustine (Treanda) for some non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Bortezomib (Velcade) for relapsed mantle cell lymphoma and Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia. Bortezomib will also be limitedvelcade_MP_thumb in some cases of myeloma, while Cetuximab will be unavailable as second or third line treatment in colorectal cancer. For American oncologists these agents have become standards of care.

Many physicians in England are outraged. Mark Flannagan, executive chief of the Beating Bowel Cancer Fund described this as “bad news for bowel cancer patients” suggesting that 65% of patients with advanced colorectal cancers will confront the risk of an earlier death. Despite these draconian measures physicians may still have the opportunity to request delisted drugs under what is described as “exceptional cases.”

The breadth and scope of the drug restrictions are surprising. After all, Pemetrexed is one of the most widely used treatments for advanced lung cancer, Bevacizumab has become an established part of colorectal cancer management and Eribulin is a favored salvage regimen in recurrent breast. The withdrawal of Bortezomib, an active agent in mantle cell, Waldenström’s and myeloma, will not be suffered lightly by patients in need.

Are the problems confronting the UK an early harbinger of the same for the American medical system?

With aging populations in western societies and increasingly sophisticated medical technologies, the cost of medical care, particularly cancer care may soon become unmanageable. UK’s centralized medical care delivery through the National Health Service, a single payer system, was designed to save money. Despite its high-minded intentions, the NHS appears to be failing. While spending more money each year the dissatisfaction with medical delivery only grows. A nearly 12% increase in health care per person expenditures in England between 2009 and 2013 (₤1712 to ₤1912) was met with an 18% increase in patient complaints.

Among the problems are progressive layers of middle management that add cost without providing care.  Physicians find it more difficult to do their jobs while people inexpert in the delivery of medical care have been given decision-making power. As the English population has come to look upon health care as a right, some overuse medical services, even ER’s, for non-serious conditions. Reformers have suggested the solution may lie in charging fees for appointments or requiring an annual membership fee. In today’s political milieu however, few elected officials are likely to relish policies that end “free health care” in England.

What might solve this dilemma for medical oncology? An obvious solution is to apply resources where they are most likely to benefit patients, e.g. personalized care. While this seemed a pipe dream 20 years ago when we first introduced the concept, a growing chorus of scientists now embraces the idea. With their focus almost exclusively on genomics this new cadre of clinical investigators describe a future where each patient gets exactly the right treatment.

We applaud this thinking and fully agree. However, we must be prepared to use all platforms to achieve this worthy goal. To fill the current void phenotypic analyses offer substantive benefits. By capturing cancer biology at a functional level, these studies identify true “driver mutations,” and have the capacity to examine synergy and sequence-dependence, both beyond the scope of genomic analyses.

As human tumor primary culture analyses (such as EVA-PCD) have already been shown to double objective response rates and improve one-year survival, it is time for government officials and policymakers to re-examine the benefits of drug selection technologies that are available today.

Will the future of cancer medicine in the UK and the US be rationed under the duress of rising costs, or rational, through the application of available technologies capable of making intelligent cost- and life-saving decisions? That remains to be seen.

Toward A 100% Response Rate in Human Cancer

Oncologists confront numerous hurdles as they attempt to apply the new cancer prognostic and predictive tests. Among them are the complexities of gene arrays that introduce practicing physicians to an entirely new lexicon of terms like “splice variant, gene-rearrangement, amplification and SNP.”

Althougcancer for dummiesh these phrases may roll of the tongue of the average molecular biologists (mostly PhDs), they are foreign and opaque to the average oncologist (mostly MDs). To address this communication shortfall laboratory service providers provide written addenda (some quite verbose) to clarify and illuminate the material. Some institutions have taken to convening “molecular tumor boards” where physicians most adept at genomics serve as “translators.” Increasingly, organizations like ASCO offer symposia on modern gene science to the rank and file, a sort of Cancer Genomics for Dummies. If we continue down this path, oncologists may soon know more but understand less than any other medical sub-specialists.

However well intended these educational efforts may be, none of them are prepared to address the more fundamental question: How well do genomic profiles actually predict response? This broader issue lays bare our tendency to confuse data with results and big data with big results. To wit, we must remember that our DNA, originally provided to each of us in the form of a single cell (the fertilized ovum) carries all of the genetic information that makes us, us. From the hair follicles on our heads to the acid secreting cells in our stomach, every cell in our body carries exactly the same genetic data neatly scripted onto our nuclear hard-drives.
Forest
What makes this all work, however, isn’t the DNA on the hard drive, but instead the software that judiciously extracts exactly what it needs, exactly when it needs it. It’s this next level of complexity that makes us who we are. While it is true that you can’t grow hair or secrete stomach acid without the requisite DNA, simply having that DNA does not mean you will grow hair or make acid. Our growing reliance upon informatics has created a “forest for the trees” scenario, focusing our gaze upon nearby details at the expense of larger trends and insights.

What is desperately needed is a better approximation of the next level of complexity. In biology that moves us from the genotype (informatics) to the phenotype (function). To achieve this, our group now regularly combines genomic, transcriptomic or proteomic information with functional analyses. This enables us to interrogate whether the presence or absence of a gene, transcript or protein will actually confer that behavior or response at the system level.

I firmly believe that the future of cancer therapeutics will combine genomic, transcriptomic and/or proteomic analyses with functional (phenotypic) analyses.

Recent experiences come to mind. A charming patient in her 50s underwent a genomic analysis that identified a PI3K mutation. She sought an opinion. We conducted an EVA-PCD assay on biopsied tissue that confirmed sensitivity to the drugs that target PI3K. Armed with this information, we administered Everolimus at a fraction of the normal dose. The response was prompt and dramatic with resolution of liver function abnormalities, normalization of her performance status and a quick return to normal activities. A related case occurred in a young man with metastatic colorectal cancer. He had received conventional chemotherapies but at approximately two years out, his disease again began to progress.

A biopsy revealed that despite prior exposure to Cetuximab (the antibody against EGFR) there was persistent activity for the small molecule inhibitor, Erlotinib. Consistent with prior work that we had reported years earlier, we combined Cetuximab with Erlotinib, and the patient responded immediately.

Each of these patients reflects the intelligent application of available technologies. Rather than treat individuals based on the presence of a target, we can now treat based on the presence of a response. The identification of targets and confirmation of response has the potential to achieve ever higher levels of clinical benefit. It may ultimately be possible to find effective treatments for every patient if we employ multi-dimensional analyses that incorporate the results of both genomic and phenotypic platforms.

Cancer Patients Who Get Better, Get Better

JCO coverA study published in the October 20 Journal of Clinical Oncology (Use of early tumor shrinkage to predict long-term outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer treated with Cetuximab, Piessevaux H. et al, 31:3764-3775,2013) described “early tumor shrinkage” as a predictor of long-term survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. These Belgian and German investigators re-analyzed two large clinical trials in colon cancer, CRYSTAL and OPUS, to evaluate the impact of early tumor shrinkage at eight weeks of therapy. Both studies were in patients with wild type (non-mutated) KRAS colon cancer who received chemotherapy with or without the monoclonal antibody Cetuximab.

They used a cutoff of 20 percent tumor shrinkage at eight weeks to separate “early responders” from “non-responders.” Early responders were found to have a significantly better survival. The accompanying editorial by Jeffrey Oxnard and Lawrence Schwartz (Response phenotype as a predictive biomarker to guide treatment with targeted therapies, J Clin Oncol 31:3739-3741, 2013) examined the implications of this study.

The measurement of tumor response has been a lynchpin of cancer therapeutics for decades. This was later refined under what is known as RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors) criteria. Despite this, there remained controversy regarding the impact of early response on long term survival. The current Piessevaux trial however, is only the most recent addition to a long history of studies that established the correlation between tumor shrinkage and survival. Earlier studies in colorectal, kidney, esophagus and lung cancers have all shown that early response correlates with superior outcomes.

What is gratifying in the accompanying editorial is the discussion of the “response phenotype” as a predictor of survival. Phenotype, defined as “the set of observable characteristics of an individual resulting from the interaction of its genotype with the environment” reflects the totality of human biology not just its informatics (genotype). This renewed appreciation of tumor phenotype in oncology is important for it re-focuses on tumor biology over tumor genetics.

The  ex-vivo analysis of programmed cell death (EVA-PCD) that we utilize, is itself a phenotypic platform that measures actual cellular behavior, not gene profiles, to gauge drug sensitivity. We have previously shown that the measurement of chemotherapy effect on human tumor tissue predicts response, time to progression and survival. The current study used clinical response (early tumor shrinkage) to successfully measure the same.

This analysis of early response by Piessevaux is bringing our most sophisticated investigators back to what they should have known all along.
1. Responding patients do better than non-responding patients.
2. Early measurement of response is predictive of long term outcome.
3. These measurements can and should be done in the laboratory.

Taken together, the current study supports early tumor shrinkage and by inference, ex vivo analyses, as important predictors of patient response and survival.

Chemosensitivity Testing – What It Is and What It Isn’t

Several weeks ago I was consulted by a young man regarding the management of his heavily pre-treated, widely metastatic rectal carcinoma. Upon review of his records, it was evident that under the care of both community and academic oncologists he had already received most of the active drugs for his diagnosis. Although his liver involvement could easily provide tissue for analysis, I discouraged his pursuit of an assay. Despite this, he and his wife continued to pursue the option.

As I sat across from the patient, with his complicated treatment history in hand, I was forced to admit that he looked the picture of health. Wearing a pork pie hat rakishly tilted over his forehead, I could see few outward signs of the disease that ravaged his body. After a lengthy give and take, I offered to submit his CT scans to our gastrointestinal surgeon for his opinion on the ease with which a biopsy could be obtained. I then dropped a note to the patient’s local oncologist, an accomplished physician who I respected and admired for his practicality and patient advocacy.

A week later, I received a call from the patient’s physician. Though cordial, he was puzzled by my willingness to pursue a biopsy on this heavily treated individual. I explained to him that I was actually not highly motivated to pursue this biopsy, but instead had responded to the patient’s urging me to consider the option. I agreed with the physician that the conventional therapy options were limited but noted that several available drugs might yet have a role in his management including signal transduction inhibitors.

I further explained that some patients develop a process of collateral sensitivity, whereby resistance to one class of drugs (platins, for example) can enhance the efficacy of other class of drugs (such as, antimetabolite) Furthermore, patients may fail a drug, then be treated with several other classes of agents, only then a year of two later, manifest sensitivity to the original drug.

Our conversation then took a surprising turn. First, he told me of his attendance at a dinner meeting, some 25 years earlier, where Dan Von Hoff, MD, had described his experiences with the clonogenic assay. He went on to tell me how that technique had been proven unsuccessful finding a very limited role in the elimination of “inactive” drugs with no capacity to identify “active “drugs. He finished by explaining that these shortcomings were the reason why our studies would be unlikely to provide useful information.

I found myself grasping for a handle on the moment. Here was a colleague, and collaborator, who had heard me speak on the topic a dozen times. I had personally intervened and identified active treatments for several of his patients, treatments that he would have never considered without me. He had invited me to speak at his medical center and spoke glowingly of my skills. And yet, he had no real understanding of what I do. It made me pause and wonder whether the patients and physicians with whom I interact on a daily basis understand the principles of our work. For clarity, in particular for those who may be new to my work, I provide a brief overview.

1.    Cancer patients are highly individual in their response to chemotherapies. This is why each patient must be tested to select the most effective drug regimen.

2.    Today we realize that cancer doesn’t grow too much it dies too little. This is why older growth-based assays didn’t work and why cell-death-based assays do.

3.    Cancer must be tested in their native state with the stromal, vascular and inflammatory elements intact. This is why we use microspheroids isolated directly from patients and do not grow or subculture our specimens.

4.    Predictions of response are not based on arbitrary drug concentrations but instead reflect the careful calibration of in vitro findings against patient outcomes – the all-important clinical database.

5.    We do not conduct drug resistance assays. We conduct drug sensitivity assays. These drug sensitivity assays have been shown statistically significantly to correlate with response, time to progression and survival.

6.    We do not conduct genomic analyses for there are no genomic platforms available today that are capable of reproducing the complexity, cross-talk, redundancy or promiscuity of human tumor biology.

7.    Tumors manifest plasticity that requires iterative studies. Large biopsies and sometimes multiple biopsies must be done to construct effective treatment programs.

8.    With chemotherapy, very often more is not better.

9.    New drugs are not always better drugs.

10.   And finally, cancer drugs do not know what diseases they were invented for.
While we could continue to enumerate the principles that guide our practice, one of the more important principles is humility. Medicine is a humbling experience and cancer medicine even more so. Patients often know more than their doctors give them credit for. Failing to incorporate a patient’s input, experience and wishes into the treatment programs that we design, limits our capacity to provide them the best outcome.

With regard to my colleague who seemed so utterly unfamiliar with these concepts, indeed for a large swath of the oncologic community as a whole, I am reminded of the saying “There’s none so blind as those who will not see.”

Best Chance for Colon Cancer Survival – Don’t Let It Start

Two papers in the February 23, 2012, New England Journal of Medicine reported important findings in the fight against colon cancer. The first paper (Zuber, AG et al; Colonoscopic Polypectomy and Long-Term Prevention of Colorectal Cancer Deaths) conducted by American investigators establishes the benefit of polyp removal in the prevention of death from colorectal cancer. The study conducted upon 2,602 patients who had adenomas removed reveals a 53 percent reduction in mortality from colon cancer compared with the expected death rate from the disease in this population.

To put this into perspective – virtually no intervention in the advanced disease setting provides a survival advantage. The best we can usually do once the disease is established is an improvement in time to progression. When we do observe a true survival advantage it is usually in the range of a few percentage points and never of this magnitude. How might we explain this astonishingly positive result?

One way to view this finding is to reexamine the biology of cancer. One of the leading experts in the field, Bert Vogelstein, MD, from Johns Hopkins, explained colon carcinogenesis as a pattern of gene perturbations starting at atypia, progressing to carcinoma in situ and ending with invasive, metastatic disease. According to Dr. Vogelstein, the average colon cancer found in a patient at the time of colonoscopy has been present in that person’s colon for 27 years. From there it is only a hop, skip and a jump from one-centimeter adenomatous polyp to metastatic (lethal) disease, all playing out over the last three years in the natural history of the disease. Thus, cancer truly is a disease that doesn’t grow too much, but dies too little and interrupting this process while it is still slumbering can, it would seem, lead to cures.

What I find surprising is the success of the strategy. Since it is now well established that cancer can metastasize when it has achieved the rather diminutive proportions of 0.125 cubic centimeters or less and the average polyp can only be detected at one or more cubic centimeters, it is our good fortune that so many cancers chose not to (or could not) metastasize prior to detection. Reading between the lines, those 12 patients who died of colon cancer as opposed to the expected 25.4 are presumably those with early metastasizing disease. The next frontier will be the detection of these cancers when they are teenagers and not 20-somethings. It may be that proteomic analyses will provide an avenue for earlier detection in the future.

The second article is a European study (Quintero, E et al; Colonoscopy versus Fecal Immunohistochemical Testing in Colorectal-Cancer Screening) that compared colonoscopy with fecal blood testing in a large cohort of patients. While the rates of detection for colorectal cancer were similar, the rates of detecting both advanced and early adenomas, favored colonoscopy (p < .001). This study represents an interesting adjunct to the American study described above. Specifically, if the early detection (and removal) of adenomas can confer a survival advantage then it could be argued that colonoscopy by its virtue of it’s higher detection rate of these precancerous adenomas, is the preferred “screening” modality. With over 50,000 deaths attributed to colorectal cancer in the U.S. each year, the public health benefit of colonoscopies becomes an intersecting point of discussion. Until now, fecal occult blood testing yearly or sigmoidoscopies every several years has been considered equivalent to colonoscopies every 10 years starting at age 50. Do we need to move colonoscopies to the front of the line?

What is most interesting about both these reports is the low-tech nature of the study modalities – and the astonishing efficacy of their application. Colonoscopies have been conducted for decades. They are comparatively simple, do not require affymetrix chips, and yet provide demonstrable benefit that appears to exceed anything offered, to date, by the “genomic revolution.” Perhaps we should all keep an open mind about other comparatively low-tech methodologies that can provide survival advantages.

An Ounce of Prevention

Colorectal cancer is among the leading causes of cancer death in the United States. While most patients develop this disease over a period of decades, associated with an accumulation of genetic mutations (elegantly described by Burt Vogelstein, PhD at Johns Hopkins), a small percentage of patients have a genetic predisposition for this cancer. Among these are those people that carry the familial adenomatous polyp syndrome (FAPS) and those who carry mismatch repair mutations know as Lynch syndrome.

It is the latter group who are the subject of a report in the October issue of the English journal Lancet. In this study, known as the CAPP2 trial, patients with Lynch syndrome received either placebo or 600mg of aspirin per day (the equivalent of two tablets). The results reveal a statistically significant reduction of colon cancer that clearly favored the aspirin group.

To put this in perspective, this dramatic improvement in the highest risk population didn’t come about as the result of a new signal transduction inhibitor or a monoclonal antibody. Instead, it came from the simple administration of one of mankind’s earliest medicinal substances. I applaud these English investigators in conducting this study of 861 patients.

What is most laudatory is that the intervention, while highly effective, is so inexpensive. In an era of proprietary medications and the promotion of expensive new interventions, it is indeed refreshing to read the results of a well-conducted study using an intervention available to all.

Data generated more than two decades ago established the benefit of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin for the prevention of colorectal cancer. It is gratifying that this simple intervention has additional scientific support both for those with high-risk predisposition, as well as other patients at risk for this relatively common, yet potentially lethal, malignancy.

What’s the Best Treatment for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer?

The answer is: nobody knows.

We have previously described a patient with a small bowel cancer for whom a treatment regimen contrary to the most widely used triplet was recommended. While it is arguable that small bowel adenocarcinoma is rare enough that no one really has a favorite regimen, colorectal management has become somewhat rigidly focused on FOLFOX. Yet, this popular combination may not be right for every patient with colon cancer.

We know, for example, that FOLFOX combined with Avastin provided no advantage in the adjuvant setting. We also know that the random addition of Erbitux to FOLFOX similarly failed to provide an advantage. As the modes of action differ between drugs, it is not surprising that subsets of colon cancer patients may do better with Irinotecan based therapies. Indeed, clinical trials combining the new monoclonal antibodies with Irinotecan have proven quite favorable, including the 2007 BOND-2 trial reported by investigators at Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York.

With this in mind, patients who present with both untreated colon cancer and a favorable profile for Irinotecan based combinations always interest us. One such patient presented to our attention in the last few weeks. This patient, in his mid 30s, was found to have inoperable, widely metastatic disease with extensive liver involvement. Confirmatory biopsies provided tissue for analysis and revealed no evidence of mismatch repair.

The results of the EVA-PCD platform were interesting on many levels. First, the EGFr active drugs provided a uniquely favorable profile, as did the down-stream inhibition of the MEK-ERK inhibitor we studied. These findings strongly suggested that the patient was RAS wild type (i.e. non-mutated). It is known that RAS mutation confers resistance to the EGFr active drugs. By inference, his sensitivity to the EGFr active drugs was prima facie evidence of RAS wild type, a finding that was confirmed later by molecular analysis. There was also a favorable profile for VEGF active drugs. Most favorable of all was the combination of Irinotecan with inhibitors of both VEGF and EGFr. This was the regimen that we selected.

We wait with interest the results of the therapy, as re-staging for response will be conducted in the coming months.

The Role of the Platinum Derivatives in Cancer Therapy

The discovery of cisplatinum and the subsequent development of its derivatives (carboplatin and oxaliplatin) represent an interesting saga in modern oncology. When Rosenberg observed in 1960s that platinum electrodes in salt water baths inhibited the growth of bacteria and fungi it lead to the isolation of cis-dichloro diamine platinum (cisplatin). Its application in testicular cancer provided a dramatic leap forward for this heretofore-lethal disease. Subsequent applications in ovary and lung cancers lead to some of the most effective therapies in modern oncology. Although the exact mechanisms of action continue to be investigated, the platination of guanine residues in DNA constitutes the principle mechanism of cytotoxicity.

The use of the human tumor laboratory model has provided us the luxury of exploring the platinum drugs in a wide variety of diseases. Among our published discoveries has been the relative equivalence of the platinum derivatives, as well as their profound synergy with agents like gemcitabine. It is of significant interest that this broadly effective class of compounds — extensively applied in the treatment of lung, colorectal, ovarian and breast cancers, as well as others — remains less active in the hematologic neoplasms. This is in striking counter distinction to nearly all other classes of chemotherapeutics.

Among our most gratifying observations, from the early 1990s, was the clear and profound activity of the platinum derivatives in breast cancers. We feel that our discoveries, outlined in an editorial published in 2000 (The Once and Future Role of Platinum Agents in Advanced Breast Cancer), in no small part have influenced the broad application of platinum in modern breast cancer management.

It was not genius or divine intervention that lead us to these important discoveries, but, quite simply, the use of a validated human tumor model that accurately probed tumor types, leading us to these findings. It is virtually impossible for an unbiased observer to review these contributions and not recognize that the human tumor model has been the conduit by which these discoveries were made.

The proper study of human cancer is human cancer. Our results speak for themselves when it comes to ovarian, breast and hematologic neoplasms, treatments for which can be traced directly to our laboratories.