A Tribute to Loretta Stamos 1939 – 2014

RAN & Loretta cropped lo res

Dr. Nagourney and Loretta Stamos

On Monday, September 22, 2014, we lost a great ally and a better friend.

Loretta Stamos lost her own fight with cancer, the very disease that she had worked so tirelessly to defeat. I first met Loretta in 1995 when her brother Jake was diagnosed with advanced lung cancer. His physicians didn’t offer much hope. At our meeting, I explained my approach to cancer therapy using each patient’s cells to select drugs (EVA-PCD functional profile).

“Let’s do it,” said Loretta.

“Now?” I asked.

“Why not?” she replied. As I would come to know over our 20 year friendship, Loretta didn’t mince words and was not one to take no for an answer.

A simple two drug combination was recommended for Jake, but his physicians declined. Loretta asked if I would assume his care. As I was out-of-network for his HMO, each time we treated her brother, Loretta generously covered the chemotherapy costs. After two cycles of treatment, the pleural fluid stopped accumulating. Jake gained weight and returned to some of his normal activities.

The in-network physicians began to realize that they were on the wrong side of this equation and suddenly offered to continue the treatments at their facility. Jake’s cancer ultimately progressed. His extensive metastatic disease involving his lung and bones was too aggressive for even the best chemotherapy to cure. Despite the sad loss, we had succeeded in showing that every patient deserved the chance to get better regardless of their insurance or finances.

Loretta wondered what would have happened if she had not been there to help. I explainRAN_LS_JS2 lo resed that the laboratory analyses were too costly for me to donate. Though they came in at a fraction of the price of a single dose of chemotherapy, many insurers refused to cover them. Loretta said, “I’m going to make sure that people who need these tests will never be denied.” And the Vanguard Cancer Foundation (VCF) was born.

Months of work, committee meetings and planning sessions culminated in a “A Night in Brazil,” a gala benefit that raised $100,000. John Stamos, Dave Coulier and Bob Saget turned in stellar performances as the MCs and a great time was had by all. More importantly, for the first time we could to say to patients, “We can find the treatment that’s right for you and if you can’t afford it, we’ll give it to you.” With each passing year the fund grew as did the number of patients we could help.

John and Loretta Stamos w-Sarah AmentoWhat a luxury to never turn a patient away. What an opportunity to help uninsured and younger patients. What a pleasure to see the good responses, even in some patients considered previously “untreatable.” I was overwhelmed by Loretta’s dedication and the kindness that she and the VCF members showed to patients in need. Every year we would recognize Loretta and her family for their hard work and generous contributions, and every year Loretta would say that she did this because “I made her brother smile.”

There is a silver lining to even the darkest cloud. It was Loretta who put it most poignantly when she defined the mission of the Vanguard Cancer Foundation as providing lifesaving care to “persons of worth but not of means.” The most fitting tribute of all for this noble soul is the more than 400 patients who can thank Loretta Stamos for a second chance at life.

About Dr. Robert A. Nagourney
Dr. Nagourney received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Boston University and his doctor of medicine at McGill University in Montreal, where he was a University Scholar. After a residency in internal medicine at the University of California, Irvine, he went on to complete fellowship training in medical oncology at Georgetown University, as well as in hematology at the Scripps Institute in La Jolla. During his fellowship at Georgetown University, Dr. Nagourney confronted aggressive malignancies for which the standard therapies remained mostly ineffective. No matter what he did, all of his patients died. While he found this “standard of care” to be unacceptable, it inspired him to return to the laboratory where he eventually developed “personalized cancer therapy.” In 1986, Dr. Nagourney, along with colleague Larry Weisenthal, MD, PhD, received a Phase I grant from a federally funded program and launched Oncotech, Inc. They began conducting experiments to prove that human tumors resistant to chemotherapeutics could be re-sensitized by pre-incubation with calcium channel blockers, glutathione depletors and protein kinase C inhibitors. The original research was a success. Oncotech grew with financial backing from investors who ultimately changed the direction of the company’s research. The changes proved untenable to Dr. Nagourney and in 1991, he left the company he co-founded. He then returned to the laboratory, and developed the Ex-vivo Analysis - Programmed Cell Death ® (EVA-PCD) test to identify the treatments that would induce programmed cell death, or “apoptosis.” He soon took a position as Director of Experimental Therapeutics at the Cancer Institute of Long Beach Memorial Medical Center. His primary research project during this time was chronic lymphocytic leukemia. He remained in this position until the basic research program funding was cut, at which time he founded Rational Therapeutics in 1995. It is here where the EVA-PCD test is used to identity the drug, combinations of drugs or targeted therapies that will kill a patient's tumor - thus providing patients with truly personalized cancer treatment plans. With the desire to change how cancer care is delivered, he became Medical Director of the Todd Cancer Institute at Long Beach Memorial in 2003. In 2008, he returned to Rational Therapeutics full time to rededicate his time and expertise to expand the research opportunities available through the laboratory. He is a frequently invited lecturer for numerous professional organizations and universities, and has served as a reviewer and on the editorial boards of several journals including Clinical Cancer Research, British Journal of Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Cancer Research and the Journal of Medicinal Food.

4 Responses to A Tribute to Loretta Stamos 1939 – 2014

  1. gpawelski says:

    My condolences to the Stamos family for the lost of such an inspirational human being.

  2. I am very saddened to hear that Loretta Stamos passed away. I send my deepest sympathy to the Stamos family, to the Vanguard Cancer foundation and to everyone who loved Loretta. Blessings to all of you.

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