Functional Profiling Leads to Identification of Accurate Genomic Findings

The 2013 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, held May 31 – June 1, in Chicago, afforded the opportunity to report three studies.

Crizotinib (Xalkori) Mechanism of Action

Crizotinib (Xalkori)
Mechanism of Action

The first, “An examination of crizotinib activity in human tumor primary culture micro-spheroids isolated from patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer,” reports our experience using the EVA-PCD platform to examine the drug crizotinib. This small molecule originally developed as an inhibitor of the oncogenic pathway MET, was later found to be highly active in a subset of cancer patients who carried a novel gene rearrangement for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). It was this observation that lead to the drug (sold under the name Xalkori) being approved for the treatment of advanced ALK positive lung cancer. The subsequent observation that this same drug inhibited yet another gene target known as ROS-1 found in a subset of lung cancer patients, has led to its use in this patient population.

Our exploration of crizotinib activity identified a series of patients who received the drug and responded dramatically. This included both ALK positive and ROS-1 positive patients. One patient however, appeared highly sensitive to the drug in our studies, but was found negative for the ALK gene rearrangement by genomic analysis. We repeated our functional analysis only to the find again, the same high degree of crizotinib sensitivity. I felt confident the patient should receive crizotinib, but at the time the drug was not yet commercially available and he didn’t qualify for the protocols, as he was ALK negative.

I scoured the country looking for a way to get the patient treated with crizotinib. From Sloan Kettering to UCLA, no one could help. And then, in collaboration with my abstract co-author Ignatius Ou from UC Irvine, we decided to repeat the ALK analysis. That proved to be a very good idea. For the patient was indeed positive for ALK gene rearrangement by second analysis and subsequently responded beautifully to a treatment for which he would not otherwise qualify. Once again, phenotype trumped genotype. (The complete story of this patient can be found in Chapter 19 of Outliving Cancer.)

A final patient in the series represented a particularly interesting application of functional analysis. The patient, a young woman with an extremely rare pediatric sarcoma, had failed to respond to multiple courses of intensive chemotherapy and her family was desperate. As she approached the end of her third year in high school, it looked unlikely that she would reach her senior year. A portion of her tumor was submitted for analysis. The results confirmed relative resistance to chemotherapeutics, many of which she had already received and failed, but showed exquisite sensitivity to crizotinib. Indeed, our inclusion of crizotinib in the analysis reflected our intense effort to identify any activity for this previously refractory patient.

We reported our findings to the pediatric oncologist and encouraged them to consider an ALK rearrangement analysis, despite this particular pathway not being on anyone’s radar prior to our study. The result – a positive gene rearrangement. This led to a successful petition to the drug company for the use of this agent for an off-label indication. The response was prompt and dramatic, and remains durable to this day, nearly a year later. Again, the phenotypic analysis guided us to the correct genomic finding.

Our other presentations at this year’s meetings will be reported in future blogs.

About Dr. Robert A. Nagourney
Dr. Nagourney received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Boston University and his doctor of medicine at McGill University in Montreal, where he was a University Scholar. After a residency in internal medicine at the University of California, Irvine, he went on to complete fellowship training in medical oncology at Georgetown University, as well as in hematology at the Scripps Institute in La Jolla. During his fellowship at Georgetown University, Dr. Nagourney confronted aggressive malignancies for which the standard therapies remained mostly ineffective. No matter what he did, all of his patients died. While he found this “standard of care” to be unacceptable, it inspired him to return to the laboratory where he eventually developed “personalized cancer therapy.” In 1986, Dr. Nagourney, along with colleague Larry Weisenthal, MD, PhD, received a Phase I grant from a federally funded program and launched Oncotech, Inc. They began conducting experiments to prove that human tumors resistant to chemotherapeutics could be re-sensitized by pre-incubation with calcium channel blockers, glutathione depletors and protein kinase C inhibitors. The original research was a success. Oncotech grew with financial backing from investors who ultimately changed the direction of the company’s research. The changes proved untenable to Dr. Nagourney and in 1991, he left the company he co-founded. He then returned to the laboratory, and developed the Ex-vivo Analysis - Programmed Cell Death ® (EVA-PCD) test to identify the treatments that would induce programmed cell death, or “apoptosis.” He soon took a position as Director of Experimental Therapeutics at the Cancer Institute of Long Beach Memorial Medical Center. His primary research project during this time was chronic lymphocytic leukemia. He remained in this position until the basic research program funding was cut, at which time he founded Rational Therapeutics in 1995. It is here where the EVA-PCD test is used to identity the drug, combinations of drugs or targeted therapies that will kill a patient's tumor - thus providing patients with truly personalized cancer treatment plans. With the desire to change how cancer care is delivered, he became Medical Director of the Todd Cancer Institute at Long Beach Memorial in 2003. In 2008, he returned to Rational Therapeutics full time to rededicate his time and expertise to expand the research opportunities available through the laboratory. He is a frequently invited lecturer for numerous professional organizations and universities, and has served as a reviewer and on the editorial boards of several journals including Clinical Cancer Research, British Journal of Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Cancer Research and the Journal of Medicinal Food.

2 Responses to Functional Profiling Leads to Identification of Accurate Genomic Findings

  1. hphblog1 says:

    Reblogged this on Hope Practiced Here and commented:
    A post from the blog of Dr. Robert Nagourney …

  2. Pingback: ASCO Update: Personalized Cancer Care – Our Contributions | Dr. Robert A. Nagourney - Rational Therapeutics - Blog

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