A “Clinical Trial” Too Far

An interesting paper was published in the January 10 NEJM (Abiraterone in Metastatic Prostate Cancer with Previous Chemotherapy, Ryan et al). The study randomized 1,088 hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients to receive abiraterone plus prednisone, or placebo plus prednisone.

Abiraterone works by blocking the syntheses of testosterone (the critical survival factor for prostate cancer cells), both in the adrenal glands and within the tumor cells themselves. The drug had previously been approved for patients who had failed hormone therapy, but was only approved for those who had also failed Taxotere chemotherapy.

The results were so strongly positive in favor of the treatment arm, revealing a significant progression-free survival 16.5 versus 8.3 months (p < .001) and overall survival hazard ratio 0.75 (p = .01) that the monitoring committee invoked early stoppage rules. Virtually all of the other markers of disease also strongly favored the treatment arm. All of this speaks for an effective therapy in hormone-refractory prostate cancer and we applaud their success.

The question remains: Did we really need to conduct this study?

On a biochemical level, abiraterone represents an effective mechanism for androgen ablation. The drug has been established to work well in patients who have failed prior hormone and Taxotere chemotherapy. In that prior exposure to Taxotere would not be expected to substantively influence abiraterone efficacy, the wisdom of committing 1,088 hormone-refractory patients to a “placebo controlled” randomized trial to prove its efficacy in the Taxotere naive population seems questionable.

Prostate cancer generally afflicts older men. While most patients respond to hormonal ablation, hormone-refractory disease develops in virtually all patients over time. A comparatively mild oral therapy like abiraterone represents a demonstrably superior alternative to a comparatively toxic alternative intravenous cytotoxic drug like taxotere. Did we need to marshal a multi-million dollar trial to prove that abiraterone worked in people who had not received Taxotere, when there was absolutely no reason to believe that it wouldn’t?

The reason that this trial was conducted was to meet an increasingly onerous regulatory environment that demands that every use of every drug in every situation be proven with a large and enormously expensive clinical trial.

Registration trials cost between $10,000 and $20,000 per accrued patient. Using these figures, we can guess that this clinical trial cost between $10,000,000 and $20,000,000 to conduct. Those costs must now be recouped from patients and insurers. Thus, the very agency whose purpose is to protect patients and limit the inappropriate use of drugs has created an environment that adds to those expenses and it can be argued, prevents the appropriate use of drugs.

To put this into perspective, let’s examine the female counterpart – breast cancer. Once aromatase inhibitors showed activity in postmenopausal women, they were rapidly incorporated into clinical therapeutics. Dovetailing nicely with the established antiestrogen tamoxifen, these drugs became second line hormonal therapies. While these drugs naturally assumed their roles in hormonal management of breast cancer, no one would ever demand that a breast cancer patient with ER positive cancer first receive chemotherapy before being allowed to use the well-established aromatase inhibitors. Had the FDA demanded that no one could receive anastrozole, letrozole or Aromasin until they had had Adriamycin, there would have been a march on Washington to reverse the policy. It was obvious to all those engaged in the field that these drugs worked and that they would work at different points in hormonal management of the disease.

The physiology of and clinical experience in breast cancer management allowed smart scientists with the approval of the regulatory agencies to “crosswalk” the application of these important agents. It is time for the American public to demand that clinical trials be conducted (and resources allocated) when the questions they address can only be answered through the expenditure of these vast financial and human resources.

About Dr. Robert A. Nagourney
Dr. Nagourney received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Boston University and his doctor of medicine at McGill University in Montreal, where he was a University Scholar. After a residency in internal medicine at the University of California, Irvine, he went on to complete fellowship training in medical oncology at Georgetown University, as well as in hematology at the Scripps Institute in La Jolla. During his fellowship at Georgetown University, Dr. Nagourney confronted aggressive malignancies for which the standard therapies remained mostly ineffective. No matter what he did, all of his patients died. While he found this “standard of care” to be unacceptable, it inspired him to return to the laboratory where he eventually developed “personalized cancer therapy.” In 1986, Dr. Nagourney, along with colleague Larry Weisenthal, MD, PhD, received a Phase I grant from a federally funded program and launched Oncotech, Inc. They began conducting experiments to prove that human tumors resistant to chemotherapeutics could be re-sensitized by pre-incubation with calcium channel blockers, glutathione depletors and protein kinase C inhibitors. The original research was a success. Oncotech grew with financial backing from investors who ultimately changed the direction of the company’s research. The changes proved untenable to Dr. Nagourney and in 1991, he left the company he co-founded. He then returned to the laboratory, and developed the Ex-vivo Analysis - Programmed Cell Death ® (EVA-PCD) test to identify the treatments that would induce programmed cell death, or “apoptosis.” He soon took a position as Director of Experimental Therapeutics at the Cancer Institute of Long Beach Memorial Medical Center. His primary research project during this time was chronic lymphocytic leukemia. He remained in this position until the basic research program funding was cut, at which time he founded Rational Therapeutics in 1995. It is here where the EVA-PCD test is used to identity the drug, combinations of drugs or targeted therapies that will kill a patient's tumor - thus providing patients with truly personalized cancer treatment plans. With the desire to change how cancer care is delivered, he became Medical Director of the Todd Cancer Institute at Long Beach Memorial in 2003. In 2008, he returned to Rational Therapeutics full time to rededicate his time and expertise to expand the research opportunities available through the laboratory. He is a frequently invited lecturer for numerous professional organizations and universities, and has served as a reviewer and on the editorial boards of several journals including Clinical Cancer Research, British Journal of Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Cancer Research and the Journal of Medicinal Food.

One Response to A “Clinical Trial” Too Far

  1. Gary Dobbins says:

    touche Dr. Nagourney. Now your talking!

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