Beyond Our Borders

I recently returned from Brazil where I participated in a cancer symposium. During my visit I encountered many highly skilled physicians with expertise in breast, thoracic, gastrointestinal and orthopedic oncology. The degree of collegiality and enthusiasm was palpable. The most exciting aspect of my visit was the warm reception and extremely high level of interest in the clinical application of our laboratory platform. It was a refreshing reminder that the parochial thinking of the American oncology community is not the norm throughout the world.

Upon my return, I had the pleasure of meeting a charming 61-year-old woman from New Delhi, India. In review of her chart I recognized her name as a patient for whom we had conducted a study in February of 2012. Her husband, an accomplished businessman, had learned of our laboratory and worked diligently to obtain, process and transport a portion of his wife’s tumor from the surgical suite to our lab. Despite multiply recurrent disease and numerous prior treatments, this patient’s ovarian cancer cells revealed exquisite sensitivity to a drug combination in the laboratory. Her physicians at the Apollo Hospital of New Delhi delivered the treatment exactly as outlined by our lab, and here sitting across from me was the patient in complete remission six months later. The family had traveled from India to meet me and express their thanks.

Each of these experiences speaks volumes for the globalization of cancer care. Cancer patients, whether from Brazil, India or China are more alike than different. Each confronts a seemingly insurmountable adversary. Each in their own way seeks out the best information and advice. And each can be best managed with those treatments found uniquely effective for their tumor. Perhaps once we have conquered cancer in India and Brazil, the EVA-PCD® assay will be ultimately accepted in the United States of America.

About Dr. Robert A. Nagourney
Dr. Nagourney received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Boston University and his doctor of medicine at McGill University in Montreal, where he was a University Scholar. After a residency in internal medicine at the University of California, Irvine, he went on to complete fellowship training in medical oncology at Georgetown University, as well as in hematology at the Scripps Institute in La Jolla. During his fellowship at Georgetown University, Dr. Nagourney confronted aggressive malignancies for which the standard therapies remained mostly ineffective. No matter what he did, all of his patients died. While he found this “standard of care” to be unacceptable, it inspired him to return to the laboratory where he eventually developed “personalized cancer therapy.” In 1986, Dr. Nagourney, along with colleague Larry Weisenthal, MD, PhD, received a Phase I grant from a federally funded program and launched Oncotech, Inc. They began conducting experiments to prove that human tumors resistant to chemotherapeutics could be re-sensitized by pre-incubation with calcium channel blockers, glutathione depletors and protein kinase C inhibitors. The original research was a success. Oncotech grew with financial backing from investors who ultimately changed the direction of the company’s research. The changes proved untenable to Dr. Nagourney and in 1991, he left the company he co-founded. He then returned to the laboratory, and developed the Ex-vivo Analysis - Programmed Cell Death ® (EVA-PCD) test to identify the treatments that would induce programmed cell death, or “apoptosis.” He soon took a position as Director of Experimental Therapeutics at the Cancer Institute of Long Beach Memorial Medical Center. His primary research project during this time was chronic lymphocytic leukemia. He remained in this position until the basic research program funding was cut, at which time he founded Rational Therapeutics in 1995. It is here where the EVA-PCD test is used to identity the drug, combinations of drugs or targeted therapies that will kill a patient's tumor - thus providing patients with truly personalized cancer treatment plans. With the desire to change how cancer care is delivered, he became Medical Director of the Todd Cancer Institute at Long Beach Memorial in 2003. In 2008, he returned to Rational Therapeutics full time to rededicate his time and expertise to expand the research opportunities available through the laboratory. He is a frequently invited lecturer for numerous professional organizations and universities, and has served as a reviewer and on the editorial boards of several journals including Clinical Cancer Research, British Journal of Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Cancer Research and the Journal of Medicinal Food.

2 Responses to Beyond Our Borders

  1. gpawelski says:

    Interestingly, I received a couple of emails over the summer from people in India, asking if I would be aware of cell culture assay testing facilities available in India. They’ve said that in India, most of the oncologists still rely on Inject and wait system, they also do not go for EGFR or other analyses. There is only one facility in Pune to test for mutation analysis.

    The reason for this is that they have a very large number of labs but these labs are more of multi-analysis type offering all services under one roof. And the biggest problem in India is too many people, which means too many patients, which means that difficult cases should be avoided as they are time consuming.

    In India, they have started a continuous study process for doctors, which means that every year the doctors have to attend some studies and seminars to continue practicing. So they attend some studies and lectures for the sake of it, but there is no genuine effort to update themselves. In India, once you become popular, your practice will run, so why take the effort to improve.

    They were asking that in the interest of cancer patients, they need to change their system of cancer delivery and try to provide world class facilities to patients for cancer tests under one roof and at costs which are within reach of most cancer patients. One emailer was a social worker and she is in touch with various Charitable organizations who would be willing to help set up such a center.

    One such functional profiling lab was set up in Thailand. Wouldn’t it be nice to set one up in India?

  2. Elaine L. says:

    This would be nice, however the average patient in India wouldn’t be able to afford to pay for Assay testing.

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