What Exactly are the Targets of Targeted Therapy?

The term “targeted therapy” has entered common parlance. Like personalized medicine, targeted therapy is a generic description of drugs and combinations that inhibit specific cancer-related pathways. I am impressed by how quickly esoteric phenomena like the downstream signal in the insulin factor pathway have entered the lexicon of medical oncologists. With the advent of temsirolimus and everolimus, both rapamycin derivatives that target mTOR, we now have at our disposal agents that are every bit a part of the therapy repertoire. Unlike erlotinib that targets a specific tyrosine kinase, mTOR is a complex and multifaceted target.

There are actually two separate forms of mTOR, TORC1 and TORC2, and they sit at a critical point in cellular determination. Stimulated by the insulin growth pathway, cells must decide whether they will grow in size or divide. The mTOR proteins participate in this process by regulating protein synthesis and glucose uptake among other functions. In turn, the mTOR pathway is regulated by numerous other factors like AMP kinase and AKT. The current crop of mTOR inhibitors all target TORC1.

New classes of compounds are being developed that inhibit both TORC1 and TORC2. More interesting are the compounds that influence upstream signaling, including phosphoinositol kinase (PI3K) and AKT. What we are coming to learn, however, is that these are not targets but collections of targets. Indeed, the PI3K inhibitors themselves have influence on one, two or all of the distinct classes of phosphoinositol kinases.

Most of the studies to date have used compounds that affect all the classes equally (pan-inhibitors). Pharmaceutical companies are now developing highly selective inhibitors of this fundamental pathway. In addition, duel inhibitors that target both PI3K and mTOR are in clinical trials. What we are coming to realize is the complexity of these pathways. What may prove more vexing still is their redundancy. One well-established by-product of successful inhibition of mTOR (principally TORC1) is the upstream activity of AKT via a feedback loop. This has the undesirable affect of redoubling mTOR stimulation through the very pharmacological manipulation that was designed to inhibit it. Again, an unintended consequence of a well laid plan.

To unravel the complexities and redundancies of these processes, we have utilized the primary culture platform. It enables us to examine the end result of signal inhibition and dissect disease specific profiles. Using this approach we can partner with collaborators to define the specific operative pathways in each disease entity.

Biological complexity is the hallmark of life. We ignore it at our peril.

About Dr. Robert A. Nagourney
Dr. Nagourney received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Boston University and his doctor of medicine at McGill University in Montreal, where he was a University Scholar. After a residency in internal medicine at the University of California, Irvine, he went on to complete fellowship training in medical oncology at Georgetown University, as well as in hematology at the Scripps Institute in La Jolla. During his fellowship at Georgetown University, Dr. Nagourney confronted aggressive malignancies for which the standard therapies remained mostly ineffective. No matter what he did, all of his patients died. While he found this “standard of care” to be unacceptable, it inspired him to return to the laboratory where he eventually developed “personalized cancer therapy.” In 1986, Dr. Nagourney, along with colleague Larry Weisenthal, MD, PhD, received a Phase I grant from a federally funded program and launched Oncotech, Inc. They began conducting experiments to prove that human tumors resistant to chemotherapeutics could be re-sensitized by pre-incubation with calcium channel blockers, glutathione depletors and protein kinase C inhibitors. The original research was a success. Oncotech grew with financial backing from investors who ultimately changed the direction of the company’s research. The changes proved untenable to Dr. Nagourney and in 1991, he left the company he co-founded. He then returned to the laboratory, and developed the Ex-vivo Analysis - Programmed Cell Death ® (EVA-PCD) test to identify the treatments that would induce programmed cell death, or “apoptosis.” He soon took a position as Director of Experimental Therapeutics at the Cancer Institute of Long Beach Memorial Medical Center. His primary research project during this time was chronic lymphocytic leukemia. He remained in this position until the basic research program funding was cut, at which time he founded Rational Therapeutics in 1995. It is here where the EVA-PCD test is used to identity the drug, combinations of drugs or targeted therapies that will kill a patient's tumor - thus providing patients with truly personalized cancer treatment plans. With the desire to change how cancer care is delivered, he became Medical Director of the Todd Cancer Institute at Long Beach Memorial in 2003. In 2008, he returned to Rational Therapeutics full time to rededicate his time and expertise to expand the research opportunities available through the laboratory. He is a frequently invited lecturer for numerous professional organizations and universities, and has served as a reviewer and on the editorial boards of several journals including Clinical Cancer Research, British Journal of Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Cancer Research and the Journal of Medicinal Food.

3 Responses to What Exactly are the Targets of Targeted Therapy?

  1. Rich66 says:

    Complex indeed. Affinitor (everolimus) seems to have made nice wave in endocrine therapy of MBCa.
    Have you labbed up with it? Vere heard of Medicare off label coverage?

  2. Wendy says:

    Is the result of Afinitor on a specific person’s tumor cells something that your chemosensitivity test can show, Dr. Nagourney?

    • AFinitor (Everolimus) is a derviative of Rapamycin. Rapamycin is a natural product that revealed immune suppression properties that led to its introduction as a treatment for kidney transplant patients to suppress organ rejection. It was subsequently recognized that it also had effects on cancer via a pathway known as mTOR. There are 2 principal pathways for mTOR (TORC1 and TORC2). Downstream signaling can influence survival signals in human tumors resulting in an effect in our EVA PCD assay. We have extensively studied the parent compound (Rapamycin) for many years and have sicne included Everolimus in our assay in parallel. The drug clearly gives a signal in our assay and we have previously selected candidates for therapy using the EVA/PCD platform. It is one of a number of targeted compounds that we examine in our system.

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