Targeted Therapies — The Next Chapter

Within this blog, we have intermittently reviewed the concept of targeted therapies. To reiterate, these are classes of drugs that target specific pathways considered tumorigenic. Among the pathways initially targeted were the epidermal growth factor receptor and the closely related HER2. Shortly after the introduction of EGFr and HER2 directed therapies came the development of drugs that target another critical pathway, mTOR.

Hundreds of compounds are now under development intended to more accurately hone in on the pathways of interest in patients’ tumors. Regrettably, the medical community continues to apply old clinical trial methods to this newest era of drugs. While the selective application of drugs like: Tarceva for EGFR mutants, Herceptin for HER2 over-expressers, and Crizotinib for EML4-ALK mutants, are much more effective in patients with these gene expressions, these are a select few examples of linear thinking that bore fruit.

That is, this gene is associated with this disease state and can be treated with this drug.

Many, if not most cancers will prove to be demonstrably more complicated. Genomic trials can only succeed if we first know the gene of interest and second know that its (over) expression alone is pathogenetic for the disease entity. Even meeting these conditions is likely to result in comparatively brief partial responses due to the crosstalk, redundancy and complexity of human tumor signaling pathways — the “targets” of these new drugs.

To address these complexities, functional analytic platforms that examine outcomes, not targets, are needed. This bottom-up approach has now enabled my team to explore the activity of novel compounds. When investigators develop interesting “small molecules,” we examine the disease specificity, combinatorial potential and sequence dependence of these compounds in short-term cultures to provide meaningful insights that can then be addressed on genomic and proteomic platforms. This reduces the time required to take these new agents from bench to bedside. We cannot solve tomorrow’s questions using yesterday’s mindsets

About Dr. Robert A. Nagourney
Dr. Nagourney received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Boston University and his doctor of medicine at McGill University in Montreal, where he was a University Scholar. After a residency in internal medicine at the University of California, Irvine, he went on to complete fellowship training in medical oncology at Georgetown University, as well as in hematology at the Scripps Institute in La Jolla. During his fellowship at Georgetown University, Dr. Nagourney confronted aggressive malignancies for which the standard therapies remained mostly ineffective. No matter what he did, all of his patients died. While he found this “standard of care” to be unacceptable, it inspired him to return to the laboratory where he eventually developed “personalized cancer therapy.” In 1986, Dr. Nagourney, along with colleague Larry Weisenthal, MD, PhD, received a Phase I grant from a federally funded program and launched Oncotech, Inc. They began conducting experiments to prove that human tumors resistant to chemotherapeutics could be re-sensitized by pre-incubation with calcium channel blockers, glutathione depletors and protein kinase C inhibitors. The original research was a success. Oncotech grew with financial backing from investors who ultimately changed the direction of the company’s research. The changes proved untenable to Dr. Nagourney and in 1991, he left the company he co-founded. He then returned to the laboratory, and developed the Ex-vivo Analysis - Programmed Cell Death ® (EVA-PCD) test to identify the treatments that would induce programmed cell death, or “apoptosis.” He soon took a position as Director of Experimental Therapeutics at the Cancer Institute of Long Beach Memorial Medical Center. His primary research project during this time was chronic lymphocytic leukemia. He remained in this position until the basic research program funding was cut, at which time he founded Rational Therapeutics in 1995. It is here where the EVA-PCD test is used to identity the drug, combinations of drugs or targeted therapies that will kill a patient's tumor - thus providing patients with truly personalized cancer treatment plans. With the desire to change how cancer care is delivered, he became Medical Director of the Todd Cancer Institute at Long Beach Memorial in 2003. In 2008, he returned to Rational Therapeutics full time to rededicate his time and expertise to expand the research opportunities available through the laboratory. He is a frequently invited lecturer for numerous professional organizations and universities, and has served as a reviewer and on the editorial boards of several journals including Clinical Cancer Research, British Journal of Cancer, Gynecologic Oncology, Cancer Research and the Journal of Medicinal Food.

3 Responses to Targeted Therapies — The Next Chapter

  1. Lynn says:

    I am currently stage 4 melanoma NED ( 8 months) and have begun a trial using an anti PD 2 ( MDX 1106) and using 6 selected peptides…I am wondering what rational therapeutics tests are available for immunotherapy.

  2. Lynn says:

    oops anti PD 1

  3. MDX 1106 is a fully human IgG antibody that targets a T-cell antigen(surface protein), found on a subset of lymphocytes that is assocaited with antitumor immunity. It is designed to activate the T-cells to attack tumors within the body. It is an attractive strategy and may be very useful, particularly in tumors that respond to immune attack like melanoma and possibly kidney. Although it is theoretically possible to test this in our model, it would require the development of a new assay platform that would measure how activated lymphocytes responded against tumors in the test tube. I regret that we do not currently conduct those studies.

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